Festival of Ideas May 2017

Julia Hobsbawm

Festival of Ideas: Julia Hobsbawm
0117 927 5100

Book online

Date Times
Tue 23 May 18:30
Ticket prices: £7.00 full / £6.00 concessions / £4.50 24 and under.

Fully Connected

Twenty-five years after the arrival of the Internet, we are drowning in data and deadlines. We could never have imagined that our daily intake of information and achieving a healthy balance in our personal and professional lives could feel so complex and so unhealthy.

In recent years, organisations have come a long way towards promoting physical health literacy and some way in acknowledging mental health issues, but little has been done to address the challenges of the Internet and social media. Most organisations have not yet begun to offer solutions around better information and knowledge management or how we might develop better and more sustaining relationships.

Julia Hobsbawm argues that developing social health will help employees become more efficiently engaged with each other and their work. She sets out a path for survival and success, providing a blueprint for how to use social health to foster well-being and productivity, and to reclaim time, space and identity in our hyper-connected world.

Speaker Biography

Julia Hobsbawm has defined modern knowledge networking and created a system to teach individuals and organisations how to successfully navigate the Age of Overload. She is the world's first professor in Networking, having been made Honorary Visiting Professor by London's Cass Business School and has 30 years of experience at a senior level consulting for business.

She is the author of several books and articles covering social health, networks, communication, women in business, the media and the future of the workplace. She has written and presented the BBC Radio 4 series Networking Nation and Six Degrees of Connection. Fully Connected: How to Survive and Thrive in the Age of Overload is her latest book. She was awarded an OBE for Services to Business in 2015.

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